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The Wari Culture

Posted by Carmen Maria Guevara Protzel on Jan 4, 2020 8:45:00 AM

 

Image source: https://allthatsinteresting.com/wari-empire-brewing-chicha

The Wari culture was an old people group that dominated a big part of modern Peru from the 6th up until the 10th century. They developed from their center in the Ayacucho region and eventually ended up dominating the entire coastal and midland regions of modern Peru. They are thought to be the first culture to use military means to conquer others around them.

The Pocra culture was a subset of the ancient Wari culture. They developed between the years 500 and 1000 AD and lasted until the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire in the 16th century.

They inhabited the modern region of Huamanga in Peru. However, in their time, their territory spanned an area bordered by the Warivilcas site in the northwest, the territories of the Rucana and Sora cultures to the southeast, and the modern Ayacucho province to the east.

The Evolution of the Pocra

Not much is known about the origin of the Pocra culture, but thanks to many studies about the local languages, it was deduced that the Pocra spoke a language that was part of the Proto-Aymara or Ara language family. That means that they are likely of mountain origin, like most people who spoke a language from the Ara family.

Over the long years of their development and advancement, the Pocras became very proficient in the creation of pottery. Some outstanding pieces of distinct Pocra design were found in Conchopata and Akuchimay, as well as on the banks of the Pinawa, Teneria, and Alameda rivers.

The Pocra were faithful allies of the Hanan Chancas. However, despite some sources, no Pocra-Chanca confederation existed before the Incan conquest of these two people groups. What's more, the Uran Chankas, who were servants to the Hanan Chankas, surrendered peacefully to the Incas when the conquest began, and the Pocra remained allied with the Hanan Chancas and several other people groups, as well.

We also know that the Pocras expanded into Peru’s northern coast during their heyday. They settled primarily in the valleys of Jayanca and Pacora.

The Incan Conquest of the Pocra

Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui , the ruler of the Incan Empire from 1438 to 1471, led a campaign to conquer the Pocra and the Chanca at some point during his rule.

He took the chiefdoms close to Cusco and incorporated them into the empire. He also defeated the united Pocra-Chanca army during that campaign.

After that, he attempted to conquer the surrounding areas where the Chancas, Pocras, Soras, and the Rucanas lived. His massive Incan army managed to reach the very heart of Pocra territory and eventually defeated them.

The remaining Pocras found refuge together with the Soras in a town they called Pacora. They resisted the Incas for a long time and were heavily fortified, so Pachacuti decided to lure them out by promising them privileges and prizes in his empire. He didn't succeed, so he had to starve them out by creating food and water shortages. This was eventually successful, and the Pocra and Soras had to surrender and pledge allegiance to the empire.

The conquest of the Pocras was immensely bloody, and it devastated the population of this strong nation. Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui almost eradicated them from the face of the Earth, but he decided to leave a small Pocra entity as part of his empire. That entity lasted for more than a hundred years, until the Spanish colonial era. During the Spanish conquest, they, together with most of the native peoples, died out from the many sicknesses and plagues unknowingly brought by the Europeans.

If you’re willing to learn more about the Pocra, you should visit Peru and discover the many ancient sites scattered across the entire country. don't hesitate to Contact us for further inform,ation.

 

 

 

 

Carmen Maria Guevara Protzel

Topics: Ayacucho, culture, history, archaeology

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